Virtual Issues

Virtual Issue: Novel Ecosystems in the Anthropocene

AUGUST 2016
The theme of the 2016 Ecological Society of America meeting meeting is “Novel Ecosystems in the Anthropocene”. The BES journals team agree that given our rapidly changing climate it is more important than ever to increase our understanding of basic ecological principals so that we can predict species responses to changing and novel ecosystems. All the BES journals welcome submissions that attempt to solve these problems.

Virtual Issue: Endangered Species

MAY 2016
To celebrate Endangered Species Day 2016 the BES journals have compiled this virtual issue on the topic. The papers below are drawn from the journals and provide examples of the latest research on endangered species. They cover a broad range of plants, animals and insects as well as terrestrial and aquatic systems.

 

 

Virtual Issue: In Honour of Mark Westoby

APRIL 2016
We are pleased to honour Professor Mark Westoby in our continuing Eminent Ecologist series. Mark is the Australian Laureate Professor and leader of Genes to Goescience Research Center at Macquarie University, Sydney. Mark is a hugely influential ecologist having published a substantial oeuvre of highly cited work covering a very wide range of subjects from self-thinning to traits shift along environmental gradients, and everything in between.

Virtual Issue: Plant Ecogenomics

APRIL 2015
The editors of the Journal of Ecology are pleased to present this Virtual Issue on plant ecogenomics edited by Associate Editor Nate Swenson. The technical, computational and financial barriers that have previously limited the broad scale integration of information generated by massively parallel/next-generation sequencing technology into ecology have been substantially eroded. Ecology now stands at the brink of a revolution where our ability to quantify individual-level nucleotide and gene expression variation and microbiomes on non-model systems in experimental and field settings will generate fascinating new insights into mechanisms and outcomes of species interactions with their environments.

Virtual Issue: Demography Behind the Population

APRIL 2015
This virtual issue Demography Behind the Population highlights the interdisciplinary nature of the field as well as providing added context for the publication of our recently published cross-journal Special Feature Demography Beyond the Population showcasing the latest in demography research and linking several disciplines and scales across ecology and evolution. This Special Feature is first time that the BES journals have collaborated in this unique way.

Virtual Issue: Open Access Week 2015

OCTOBER 2015
To coincide with the 8th Annual International Open Access Week we are delighted to bring together all open access papers published in the Journal of Ecology in 2015. All five British Ecological Society Journals have produced a Virtual Issue for Open Access Week 2015. Please click on the issue covers below to read the Virtual Issues. All of these papers have been published through the Online Open programme. Members of the British Ecological Society are offered a 25% discount towards the cost of the Online Open scheme. 

Virtual Issue: Marine Ecology

OCTOBER 2015
We have selected 20 papers on marine ecology that have been published in the Journal of Ecology over the past four years. These span a wide range of ecological topics, including (but not limited to) biodiversity, herbivory, carbon sequestration, genetic diversity, and climate change. Similarly, these studies span a range of marine habitats, such as salt marshes, seagrass beds, rocky shores, and pelagic systems. One article in this Virtual Issue (Vergés et al. 2014) was featured as an Editor's Choice, as it documents the devastating impacts of a range-shifting herbivore, the tropical rabbitfish, in the eastern Mediterranean. 

Virtual Issue: Charistmatic Orchids

OCTOBER 2015
To highlight and celebrate this achievement, we have compiled a Virtual Issue of 32 papers published in the Journal of Ecology that focus on the ecology of terrestrial orchids. The largest single component comes from the Biological Flora of the British Isles. This series of autecological accounts has been running since 1941 and currently extends to 280 articles. The 12 accounts presented here include arguably the rarest British species of all (Epipogium aphyllum) and some of the most common orchids (e.g. Neottia ovata). The former, as a non-photosynthetic mycotroph, appears above ground only very erratically, as ghostly flowering spikes in the deep gloom of woodland. Yet this is the extreme of a continuum, and the capacity of many terrestrial orchids to remain effectively dormant below ground as mycotrophic tubers for one, or more, years has helped until recently to obscure their demography. Demographic studies, including those examining the influence of weather and climate on dormancy, represent another theme of the papers presented in this Virtual Issue. Nearly all terrestrial orchids have mycorrhizal associations that are distinctive to the Orchidaceae; indeed the microscopically immature seeds would never be able to emerge above ground without it. Hence this has been another rich vein for research that is represented by a group of papers here. The production of seeds in orchids is, in general, found to be pollen-limited, which appears to be something of a paradox in the context of the highly evolved relationships that many have with pollinating insects. Consequently, the final group of papers deals with reproductive biology, including pollination, and the possible impacts of a changing climate on its phenology.

Virtual Issue: In Honour of Deborah Goldberg

APRIL 2015
The Editors of the Journal of Ecology are pleased to honour Professor Deborah Goldberg in our continuing Eminent Ecologist series. Deborah is the Elzada U. Clover Collegiate Professor and Chair of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Michigan, USA. More than that, Deborah is a hugely influential community ecologist having published a large body of highly cited work investigating the processes underlying patterns in plant community dynamics. In recognition of her work we have selected 10 of her most influential papers published in the Journal of Ecology. To provide some context, Deborah has written a fascinating post for the Journal of Ecology blog. In addition, I was fortunate enough to interview Deborah in August 2014 during which we reflected over the insights, and controversies, arising from her work, as well as some of the non-ecological work that she has been involved with. This interview is available as a podcast. Read the Virtual Issue. 

Virtual Issue: Soils

DECEMBER 2014
For this Virtual Issue, we have selected 20 papers recently published in Journal of Ecology that demonstrate the breadth and international scope of soil-related research, and illustrate how ecologists are pushing our understanding of the ecological and evolutionary significance of plant-soil interactions forward. The papers cover topics such as below-ground controls on invasions, the role of soil biota in plant-plant interactions, and the influence of plant and soil community change on biogeochemical processes. We very much hope you enjoy reading these papers brought together in this collection and invite you to submit your ‘ground’ breaking research on plant-soil interactions to Journal of Ecology as a part of the celebration of the International Year of Soils. Read the Virtual Issue

Virtual Issue: Open Access Week 2014

OCTOBER 2014
To coincide with the 7th Annual International Open Access Week we are delighted to bring together all open access papers published in the Journal of Ecology in 2014. All five British Ecological Society Journals have produced a Virtual Issue for Open Access Week 2014. Please click on the issue covers below to read the Virtual Issues. All of these papers have been published through the Online Open programme. Members of the British Ecological Society are offered a 25% discount towards the cost of the Online Open scheme.

Virtual Issue: In Honour of J Philip Grime

DECEMBER 2013
Professor J. Philip Grime is one of the UK’s most influential, and controversial, plant ecologists. Phil is a Fellow of The Royal Society, and also a member of the Dutch Royal Society, and has received numerous awards including The Marsh Award, Honorary membership of the BES and ESA, and the Alexander von Humboldt Award. In recognition of his many achievements we have collected together 15 of his most influential papers in the Journal of Ecology as a Virtual Issue: all the papers have been made free to access. To give some background to the papers Phil has very kindly written a post for the Journal of Ecology blog, which briefly introduces Phil’s research approach and puts the papers in context. There are some great photographs of the people, places and various experiments at the end of the post. In addition to this there is also a podcast where Phil reflects on his career and the changes in ecology over the last 50 years - he also answers several questions sent in via Twitter. Read the Virtual Issue. 

Virtual Issue: Facilitation and Scaling

SEPTEMBER 2013
The Editors of Journal of Ecology are pleased to present this Virtual Issue on Facilitation and Scaling to coincide with the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of Germany. At this meeting Chris Smit, Santiago Soliveres, Fernando Maestre and Johannes Metz are organising a special session, which will discuss the progress that has been made in facilitation research since the last international meeting focused on facilitation took place in 2009. Read Santiago Soliveres’ post on the Journal of Ecology blog for further information. Read the Virtual Issue. 

Virtual Issue: In Honour of Michael Hutchings

AUGUST 2013
Professor Michael (Mike) John Hutchings retired as Editor-In-Chief of Journal of Ecology at the end of 2012. Under his supervision, the Journal’s stature not only kept up with the changing landscape of scientific publishing, but grew, even eclipsing competing journals sometimes seen as more general in scope. Mike’s contributions to the Journal of Ecology have been immense over the years. Prior to serving as the Editor-In-Chief of the Journal from 2004 to 2012, he served as Associate Editor from 1985 to 1999 and as Editor from 1999-2004. His contributions to the Journal include not only nearly 30 years of editorial service, but also the publication of many of his most significant findings. Indeed, the Journal of Ecology has been Mike’s first choice for his own first-authored work. It is hard to imagine the Journal without him. We hope that readers will enjoy this Virtual Issue, which highlights the breadth of his scientific contributions to the Journal with 19 papers spanning the period from 1976 to 2012. Read the Virtual Issue

Virtual Issue: International Collaboration

AUGUST 2013
 International Collaboration Virtual Issue In The British Ecological Society and INTECOL will hold the 11th International Congress of Ecology in London as part of the society's centenary celebrations. The papers below are from a selection of keynote and plenary speakers, and represent one of the key themes of INTECOL – international collaboration. These papers all demonstrate international collaboration across multiple countries, in some cases as many as six or seven different countries. Together, they highlight the importance of international co-operation as the scope of ecology, and ecologists, grows wider.

Virtual Issue: Freshwater Ecology - Understanding ecosystems and reducing anthropogenic environmental stress

AUGUST 2013
Produced to complement the publication of he new Ecological Issues volume 'The Impact of Extreme Events on Freshwater Systems', this Virtual Issue provides a brief flavour of how papers in all five BES Journals since 2010 have contributed to basic scientific knowledge, improved understanding of environmental stress and the effectiveness of restoring freshwater ecosystems. Read the Virtual Issue


Virtual Issue: BES Young Investigator Prizes - winners and highly commended papers 2012

MARCH 2013

Each year the BES awards a prize for the best paper, in each of its journals, by an author at the start of their research career. This virtual issue brings together the winning papers and those selected by the editors as worthy of special mention as runners up from journal issues published in 2012. Congratulations to all concerned.
Read the Virtual Issue
 

 

Virtual Issue: BES Young Investigator Prizes - winners and runners up 2011

FEBRUARY 2012

Virtual Issue on the role of litter in ecosystems Each year the BES awards a prize for the best paper, in each of its journals, by an author at the start of their research career. This virtual issue brings together the winning papers and those selected by the editors as worthy of special mention as runners up from journal issues published in 2011. Congratulations to all concerned.
Read the Virtual Issue
 
 

Virtual Issue on Open Access

October 2011
Virtual Issue on open access To coincide with the 5th Annual Open Access Week, the five journals of the British Ecological Society are pleased to publish a virtual issue of open access papers recently published in the Journal of Ecology, Journal of Animal Ecology, Journal of Applied Ecology, Functional Ecology and Methods in Ecology and Evolution.

 
 

Virtual Issue BES Young Investigator Prizes

MARCH 2011
Each year the BES awards a prize for the best paper, in each of its journals, by an author at the start of their research career. This virtual issue brings together the winning papers and those selected by the editors as worthy of special mention as runners up. Congratulations to all concerned.


 

Virtual Issue on Global Warming

JULY 2010
The editors of Journal of Ecology are pleased to present this Virtual Issue on Global Warming to coincide with the 95th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 2010, which places global warming at center stage. This Virtual Issue is a selection of 14 papers published in Journal of Ecology over the last 4 years on the topic of climate change. The papers not only demonstrate the breadth of work published in the Journal on this topic, but also show that effects of climate change are far ranging.
 

In Memoriam Robert L Jefferies

JULY 2010
Photographer: Krista Hanis Professor R.L. (Bob) Jefferies was a highly respected, productive and influential ecologist, who published much of his core output in some 29 papers in the Journal of Ecology, over a period of 47 years. Nineteen of these papers, spanning his entire career, are assembled in this virtual issue. Bob also served the Journal as an energetic Associate Editor from 1988 until his untimely death, at the height of his powers, in 2009. To commemorate the first anniversary of his death, the Editors have compiled a Virtual Issue of his most important papers published in the Journal.
 

Virtual Issue on Biodiversity

JUNE 2010
In recognition of International Year of Biodiversity, 2010, the five journals of the British Ecological Society - Journal of Ecology, Journal of Animal Ecology, Journal of Applied Ecology, Functional Ecology and Methods in Ecology and Evolution - are pleased to publish a Virtual Issue of papers with biodiversity as a common theme.

 
 

In Memoriam John L Harper

JULY 2009
Professor John L Harper was a formidable plant ecologist and teacher who revolutionized our discipline and had a huge impact on its development as a modern science. He inspired generations of young researchers and will be remembered with great affection and gratitude by plant ecologists throughout the world.

Following his death in March 2009, the Editors of Journal of Ecology delved into the journal's archives to compile and highlight once more some of his classic contributions in this Virtual Issue.
 

The Southern Hemisphere

JULY 2009
The editors of Journal of Ecology are pleased to present this Virtual Issue on The Southern Hemisphere in recognition of the 2009 10th International Congress in Ecology in Brisbane, Australia. This Virtual Issue is a selection of 20 papers published in Journal of Ecology over the last three years. All studies were either carried out by ecologists based in the southern hemisphere or were conducted in a southern hemisphere country, including Argentina, Australia, Chile, Gabon, New Zealand, South Africa and Tanzania.

Search the Site

Search

 

Site Adverts